E3 Electronic Entertainment Expo – Happy Days

E3 Electronic Entertainment Expo








Every year, there’s a video games fest called E3 ( Electronic Entertainment Expo) in Los Angeles which sees geeks collect together and view what the uber geeks have in store for them over the next year or so. And the 2012 event has just closed. But just what future does the industry have over the coming years?

The video games industry has always been keen to portray itself in the same way as Hollywood and the film business does. Although the number of people whose ‘game’ has actually increased, the nature of gaming has in reality stayed the same for many years.

 

Serious, hardcore gamers lap up the big productions and keep the belief going that the industry has a major future. The remaining gamers are softcore participants who are happier with a simple game on their smartphone.

 

And therein lies the problem for the gaming industry: the platform tends to lead the way.

 

A video game is content, just as a film is content. But movies and TV shows can be shown across all platforms, whereas games have to be coded differently for them to work on individual platforms. Because of the degree of interaction, games need this individual platform (PlayStation, Xbox, PC, etc) coding and what’s more, they have to be made with the technical criteria firmly in mind. Obviously, a game built for a hi-end spec PC is not going to work on a smartphone.

 

So what you have in the gaming industry is the potential slowdown of the mega-game (there will always be huge demand for a small number of the major franchises) and an increase in popularity of the more simplistic app game which can be played across most platforms (mostly handheld devices).

 

And it’s this shrinking of the mega-game market that worries the industry companies. A modern blockbuster game will take at least two years to produce and cost millions. Indeed, the timescale and budgets will rival a movie.

 

Yet an app game can be produced for a fraction of the cost and in a very short time. Thus, the App market is not a bad place to be right at this moment; whereas a full-blown video game project can literally bust a company.

 

For the likes of Electronic Arts and Microsoft, they have deep enough pockets to take the hit, but smaller games companies are finding that too much crystal ball gazing into the future of the market is upsetting.

 

In these economic times and with the consumer’s preferences in doubt, the number of major games being commissioned will fall, whereas the smaller productions are likely to rise.

 

There are indeed interesting times ahead!

 

About Biljana Dimovska:
Biljana Dimovska is a technology writer, and is a regular contributor to the media on how companies market themselves in the digital age. Biljana is SEO Manager of the digital marketing team at SEO Berkshire agency Cayenne Red.

Biljana Dimovska is a technology writer, and is a regular contributor to the media on how companies market themselves in the digital age. Biljana is SEO Manager of the digital marketing team at SEO Berkshire agency Cayenne Red.

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